Tiruveedhula plays her move in chess

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Tiruveedhula plays her move in chess

Saanvi Tiruveedhula showing her trophies.

Saanvi Tiruveedhula showing her trophies.

Hannah Thomas

Saanvi Tiruveedhula showing her trophies.

Hannah Thomas

Hannah Thomas

Saanvi Tiruveedhula showing her trophies.

Hannah Thomas, Business Editor

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Freshman Saanvi Tiruveedhula is known to be a skilled chess player. She competes in tournaments and has won many awards.

Tiruveedhula has been playing chess since the age of six. When she was introduced to it, encouraged by her father, she struggled with learning the rules and tactics to use.

“It was confusing on the rules and what tactics to use, but I started to understand the game, which I was proud of,” Tiruveedhula said.

Tiruveedhula practices for 3 to 4 hours each day to improve her skills. She spends her time learning from her teachers, online games, and tactics.

Her parents encourage her to do her best by motivating and driving. Even when she doesn’t win, her parents are there to uplift her mood.

“They [my parents] support me a lot and all of this wouldn’t be possible without them,” Tiruveedhula said.

Tiruveedhula thinks her father wants to give her an opportunity to learn and gain knowledge of playing something challenging. He believes Tiruveedhula will use the thinking techniques she learns in the world. 

Tiruveedhula was given advice to her to keep trying even if she wins and she keeps the advice in mind. Tiruveedhula will still work harder for her future even when she wins. 

“It might be hard in the beginning, but if you keep practicing you’ll get there,” Tiruveedhula said.

Tiruveedhula goes to several competitions and tournaments all over the country. She travels to many places such as Philadelphia, Florida, and Las Vegas, where tournaments are held.

Tiruveedhula remembers her first award she received in the fourth grade. She was ecstatic when showing her parents.

“When you put all the hard work into something you love doing . . . the feeling is rewarding,” Tiruveedhula said. 

Tiruveedhula hopes to improve her tactics so she could can win a scholarship to Webster University in Missouri because she wants to learn from the teacher, Grand Master Alexander. 

“Being able to be taught by someone whom you admire is an opporunity I would love to take,” Tiruveedhula said.